Bunk: The Rise Of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post Facts, And Fake News

Author: Kevin Young (University of Calgary Canada)
Homepage 9781555977917

Stock information

General Fields

  • : $49.95(AUD)
  • : 9781555977917
  • : Graywolf Press
  • : Graywolf Press
  • :
  • : 0.998
  • : November 2017
  • : 231mm X 160mm X 48mm
  • :
  • : 49.95
  • :
  • :
  • :
  • : books

Special Fields

  • :
  • :
  • : Kevin Young (University of Calgary Canada)
  • :
  • : Hardback
  • :
  • :
  • :
  • : 001.95
  • :
  • :
  • :
  • : Illustrations, unspecified
  • :
  • :
  • :
Barcode 9781555977917
9781555977917

Reviews

"Riveting. . . . Young covers, and uncovers, America's long and varied history of deceptive practices."--Elle"[A] thorough examination of two centuries of hoaxing. . . . Original and illuminating."--BBC Culture"[A] profoundly erudite new study of the ways truthiness, as Stephen Colbert used to call it, travels through America's fabric."--Literary Hub"[Kevin Young is] second to none in his ability to make unlikely pop cultural connections and bring in a vast and complex sense of history."--Vol. 1 Brooklyn"As exhaustive as its subtitle: part survey of modern imposture, part detective story about the origins of American fakery. . . . It's an important book for 2017, not only because 'fake news' is a part of the zeitgeist, but because public discourse about white supremacy and political hucksterism suffers from citizens' short memory. . . . Bunk is a consistently incisive look at the nature of American imposture and epistemology itself: How do we know what we know, how do we learn? How do we undo what we learn, and how do we avoid making the same mistakes?"--Harvard Magazine"Young chronicles a distinctly American brand of deception in this history of hoaxers, fabricators, liars, and imposters. . . . [He] astutely declares the hoax a frequent metaphor for a 'deep-seated cultural wish' that confirms prejudicial ideas and stereotypes. . . . Young's remarks on race and his comparison of Trump and Barnum, both of whom gained power from spectacle, in the book's coda are well worth sifting through."--Publishers Weekly, starred review"As we adjust to life with a president who plays fast and loose with the truth and whose backstory arouses growing skepticism, this examination of the long and colorful history of hoaxes and cons is most welcome. . . . Compelling and eye-opening."--Booklist, starred review"Fake news and alternative facts have a long and complex history in American culture. Young, an award-winning poet and director of the New York Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, explores the deep roots of hoaxing in entertainment, literature, journalism, sports, and public life. . . . The final chapter touches on the current 'post-fact' world and its rejection of expertise, raising important questions about how we can know the truth. This dense and wide-ranging critique offers a fascinating view of the impact of fraud on truth."--Library Journal, starred review"A fascinating, well-researched look at the many ways Americans hoodwink each other, often about race."--Kirkus Reviews "As exhaustive as its subtitle: part survey of modern imposture, part detective story about the origins of American fakery. . . . It's an important book for 2017, not only because 'fake news' is a part of the zeitgeist, but because public discourse about white supremacy and political hucksterism suffers from citizens' short memory. . . . Bunk is a consistently incisive look at the nature of American imposture and epistemology itself: How do we know what we know, how do we learn? How do we undo what we learn, and how do we avoid making the same mistakes?"--Harvard Magazine"Young chronicles a distinctly American brand of deception in this history of hoaxers, fabricators, liars, and imposters. . . . [He] astutely declares the hoax a frequent metaphor for a 'deep-seated cultural wish' that confirms prejudicial ideas and stereotypes. . . . Young's remarks on race and his comparison of Trump and Barnum, both of whom gained power from spectacle, in the book's coda are well worth sifting through."--Publishers Weekly, starred review"As we adjust to life with a president who plays fast and loose with the truth and whose backstory arouses growing skepticism, this examination of the long and colorful history of hoaxes and cons is most welcome. . . . Compelling and eye-opening."--Booklist, starred review"Fake news and alternative facts have a long and complex history in American culture. Young, an award-winning poet and director of the New York Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, explores the deep roots of hoaxing in entertainment, literature, journalism, sports, and public life. . . . The final chapter touches on the current 'post-fact' world and its rejection of expertise, raising important questions about how we can know the truth. This dense and wide-ranging critique offers a fascinating view of the impact of fraud on truth."--Library Journal, starred review"A fascinating, well-researched look at the many ways Americans hoodwink each other, often about race."--Kirkus Reviews "Young chronicles a distinctly American brand of deception in this history of hoaxers, fabricators, liars, and imposters. . . . [He] astutely declares the hoax a frequent metaphor for a 'deep-seated cultural wish' that confirms prejudicial ideas and stereotypes. . . . Young's remarks on race and his comparison of Trump and Barnum, both of whom gained power from spectacle, in the book's coda are well worth sifting through."--Publishers Weekly, starred review"Fake news and alternative facts have a long and complex history in American culture. Young, an award-winning poet and director of the New York Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, explores the deep roots of hoaxing in entertainment, literature, journalism, sports, and public life. . . . The final chapter touches on the current 'post-fact' world and its rejection of expertise, raising important questions about how we can know the truth. This dense and wide-ranging critique offers a fascinating view of the impact of fraud on truth."--Library Journal, starred review"A fascinating, well-researched look at the many ways Americans hoodwink each other, often about race."--Kirkus Reviews

Author description

Kevin Young is the author of a previous book of nonfiction, The Grey Album, and eleven books of poetry, including Blue Laws, which was long-listed for the National Book Award. He is the director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem.